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Lost in Digitalisation? Profiles as Means of Orientation in Computer-based Media Cultures JULIUS OTHMER/ANDREAS WEICH Any medium develops its own specific set of means of orientation. This set can facilitate orientation in terms of sorting formats and content and of structuring time, space and knowledge, for example. But these means are not necessarily invented by the given medium itself but adopted and remediated (Bolter/Grusin 2000) according to its needs and conditions. TV, for example, borrowed the programme structure from the theatre, reconfigured

DCS | Digital Culture and Society | Vol. 4, Issue 2 | © transcript 2019 DOI 10.14361/dcs-2018-0204 The Ironies of Digital Citizenship Educational Imaginaries and Digital Losers Across Three Decades Lina Rahm Abstract Our everyday use of digital technologies, platforms and infrastruc- tures is often portrayed as an autonomous technical development, guided by clever and independent innovations, rather than broad sociotechnical imaginaries that inspire parliamentary support and governance. This article will consequently shed the light on the often- overlooked

Ethnographic Perspectives across Global Online and Offline Spaces
Zwischen Computeranimation und Live-Action. Die neue Bildästhetik in Spielfilmen
Series: Film
Aspekte der Wissensvermittlung in Kunst, Kultur und Technologie
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DCS | Digital Culture and Society | Vol. 3, Issue 2 | © transcript 2017 DOI 10.14361/dcs-2017-0205 Digital Mediation, Soft Cabs, and Spatial Labour Donald N. Anderson Abstract Critics of digitally mediated labour platforms (often called the “sharing” or “gig economy”) have focused on the character and extent of the control exerted by these platforms over both workers and cus- tomers, and in particular on the precarizing impact on the workers on whose labor the services depend. Less attention has been paid to the specifically spatial character of the forms of

DCS | Digital Culture and Society | Vol. 3, Issue 2 | © transcript 2017 DOI 10.14361/dcs-2017-0214 Mad Practices and Mobilities Bringing Voices to Digital Ethnography Cherry Baylosis Abstract There is a claim that digital media technologies can give voice to the voiceless (Alper 2017). As Couldry (2008) points out it is now com- monplace for people – who have never done so before – to tell, share and exchange stories within, and through digital media. Additionally, the affordances of mobile media technologies allow people to speak, virtually anytime and